Washington Post -- Important US News

It was an out-of-character role for a president used to commanding and demanding center stage: seen but not publicly heard outside the confines of his team’s highly-controlled communications operation.
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Hardly three hours had passed in the workweek when the shutdown drama ended in the Senate and a strange scene of short-term bipartisan bonhomie unfolded on Capitol Hill.
President Trump signed the measure to fund the government through Feb. 8 after it passed the Senate and House on the strength of a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that he would address the status of young immigrants called “dreamers” who were brought to this country illegally as children. Thirty-three Senate Democrats joined 48 Republicans to break the impasse.
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The shutdown exposed the challenges facing congressional Democrats daily: how to wrangle victories while in the minority and keep the party’s base energized ahead of the November elections.
Democratic senators believe that a Senate immigration bill passing with a significant bipartisan majority would ultimately force House Republicans to capitulate on the issue. But House conservatives won't be easy to sway, and the president remains a true wild card.
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